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hearing for john brennan, the president's nominee, a good man, to be the next director of the cia. and brennan is known at the whitehouse, among other things, former deputy at cia, for being the architect of america's drone policy. he is the one who decides when drones are used and who they are targeted and what american citizens might be targeted. this is bound to come up. several senators have already told me they are going to craze this question with john brennan and publicly said so. and just at the time they are preparing for this hearing this white paper, this was written by department of justice, for members of congress and sent to them last summer but for some reason, it never -- nobody ever leaked it until this week. we still don't know who leaked it. but this paper is pretty chilling. the paper is an unclassified document. so there is no breach of national security here and it's a department of justice explaining why they think the use of drones to kill american citizens on foreign soil is just justified justified. and they say it is -- it'
all existing ongoing cia covert operations and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a number of them. >> narrator: at the center of obama's covert war: targeted killings-- death by drone. >> the fact that barack obama would be the guy that leads america into this world of predator drones and navy seals and cyber warfare and sort of the dark arts of the special forces and the cia-- and that would be a major part of his foreign policy-- i don't think anyone would have predicted that. >> he's the first bel peace prize winner with a kill list. and it is very disappointing to his base. it is very disappointing to civil liberties supporters who thought he was going to be much more of a stereotypical liberal. >> narrator: in the spring of 2011, obama's covert war scored a significant victory. it began with a single piece of intelligence. cia director leon panetta had learned osama bin laden might be living in a compound in pakistan. >> the intelligence case was entirely circumstantia bodyaw oma b laden, had a full id on him. >> how
's mick to head the cia readies to testify this afternoon on capitol hill, calls for greater transparency and legal justification for the killings have increased. the outcry reached a crescendo on monday when nbc's michael isikoff obtained a leaked white pair from the government suggesting that the u.s. government can kill american set zenz overseas without any specific intelligence indicating they are engaged in an active plot to attack the u.s. the expansive legal framework set off alarm bells. >> every american has the right to know when their government believes it's allowed to kill them. i don't think that as one person said, that is too much to ask. >> the "new york times" wrote "it was disturbing to see the twisted logic of the administration's lawyers laid out in black and white. it brought back unwelcome memories of memos written for president george w. bush to justify illegal wiretapping, indefinite detention, kidnapping, abuse, and torture. "time's" writer david carr put it more success iktly. drones, very effective at targeting and wiping out rule of law. the ensuing uproar ov
of waterboard and detention made their voices heard at yesterday's confirmation hearing for john brennan as cia director. >> they won't even tell congress what country we are killing children in. >> please -- >> senator feinstein. >> if you could please expedite the removal. >> more important than the children of pakistan and yemen? are they more important? do your job! >> the hearing serve as a public discussion of the most controversial counterterrorism policies that began under president george w. bush and, in part, have continued and expanded under president obama. brennan's defense of the secrecy surrounding the administration's most questionable program, targeted assassinations using drone aircraft, was as opaque as the program itself. >> what we need to do is optimize transparency on these issues, but at the same time optimize secrecy and the protection of our national security. i don't think that it's one or the other. it's trying to optimize both of them. >> some senators, including ron widen and angus king, pushed brennan to explain the legal at and justification for assassinating ame
's nominee to head the c.i.a. faces the music today. going to be a rough and tumble hearing. what do you say? particularly about drones. what do you say? good morning everybody. it is thursday, february 7. good to see you and welcome -- welcome to the program this thursday morning. always great to see you. look particularly good this morning here as we kick off our three hour roundtable to bring you up to date on the latest news of the day and of course to take your calls at 1-866-55-press. that's our toll free number. we'll tell you what's happening here in our nation's capital. that's where you find us, by the way, right on capitol hill, down the street from the united states capitol building and what's happening here in washington, around the country around the globe bringing it to you and again give you a chance to comment. you can do so by giving us a call at the toll free number, 1-866-55-press or follow us on twitter at bpshow, at bpshow. give us your comments there on facebook. on yes, indeed. team press here. present, ready to serve you. peter ogborn and
, with more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. that's eight times as many as under president george w. bush. and now nbc news's michael isikoff has obtained a 16-page justice department memo that makes the legal argument to justify this administration's use of drones to kill terror suspects, including american citizens. the government can order the killing of its own citizens without due process if those citizens are believed to be senior operational leaders of al qaeda or an associated force, even if there is no intel indicating they are involved in an active plot to attack the united states. today attorney general eric holder addressed the issue. >> we only take these kinds of actions when there is an eminent threat, when capture is not feasible, and when we are confident we are doing so in a way that is consistent with federal and international law. >> yet, according to the memo, the government gets to define the word "eminent" in a very broadway. the condition that an operational leader present an imminent threat of violent attack against the united states does
to the cia fact book, literacy rate overall is 20%. given those numbers, how difficult is it your job of getting information to afghanis? guest: when you see almost 28% of the country is illiterate, meaning more than 72% mark is illiterate, that means we are faced with people they are not easy to receive things or digest things, so it is very hard in a country like afghanistan with the fact that more than 70% are illiterate, on the other hand, in afghanistan security, reaching for the people because of bad [indiscernible] because of the geographic afghanistan, it is hard to work, but it does not mean it will stop us. host: our guest abdul mujeeb khalvatgar is director of nai media institute. we're talking about journalism in afghanistan, how afghanis get their news and the freedom of the press in that country. we want to take your phone calls on this. the numbers -- here is the world news section of the "wall street journal." afghan peace still sought in six months. i am wondering, is this the type of headlines afghanis would see, the second to read the newspapers or have the newspape
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)